2/12 Cooper St, Macksville, NSW, 2447

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

WHAT IS TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS?

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic condition in which the body is not able to properly regulate blood sugar levels. Either the body isn’t producing enough insulin, and/or it is resistant to the insulin. As insulin is involved in regulating your blood sugar levels, T2DM causes poor regulation of blood sugar levels.

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS?

  • Poor diet
  • Low physical activity levels
  • Abdominal fat
  • Genetic predisposition


WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF DIABETES?

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE LONG TERM COMPLICATIONS OF T2DM IF BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS AREN’T WELL CONTROLLED?


HOW IS DIABETES DIAGNOSED?

Your blood glucose levels can be assessed in a variety of different ways. These may include different types of blood glucose testing. From the results you may be diagnosed as prediabetic or with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

HOW IS DIABETES TREATED?

Diet; increasing amount of slow release carbohydrate, decreasing refined carbohydrates/high sugar food, trans fats and saturated fats.

Regular Exercise; It is recommended that patients with T2DM or pre-diabetes accumulate a minimum of 210 minutes per week of moderate-intensity exercise or 125 minutes per week of vigorous intensity exercise with no more than two consecutive days without training

Medication; medication can be very effective at controlling blood sugar levels and your doctor will work with you to find the right medication for you.

Insulin therapy


WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF EXERCISING?

Exercise is unsafe for uncontrolled T2DM. An Exercise Physiologist will assess your conditions, physical functioning and blood glucose levels and work with you to design an exercise program tailored to you.

Studies have show that targeted physical activity and nutritional goals together have been highly successful in preventing the onset of T2DM.

Moderate intensity exercise increases your insulin sensitivity and decreases your blood glucose levels for up to 2-48 hours.

Both cardiovascular exercise (walking, riding, swimming, kayaking etc.) and strength exercises (weight training, squats, bench push ups etx.) are beneficial for improving your control of your blood sugar levels. As diet changes for treatment of T2DM often involve low caloric intake; strength training is really important to maintain your strength and muscle.

Regular exercise also improves body composition, decreases your risk of cardiovascular disease and improves your physical function.

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